New Jersey Work Environment Council Finds Workers at High Risk of Chemical Exposure

By workinjury on October 17, 2013

According to a study released by the New Jersey Work Environment Council, workers and communities within the State of New Jersey are at a high risk of being harmed in a toxic chemical disaster, despite efforts to reduce the odds of one happening. According to an article posted on NJ.com, the Council’s report indicates that there are many jobsites throughout the state that are at risk of causing a dangerous chemical release simply due to the nature of the hazardous materials at use at the sites.

The executive director of the Council stated that the report, titled “Failure to Act: New Jersey Jobs and Communities are Still at Risk from Toxic Chemical Disaster,” was created to evaluate the progress of New Jersey’s industries and their adoption of safer procedures in handling toxic materials. The Director stated that the industries were not adopting practical safer technologies and processes in an effort to reduce the risk of an environmental disaster occurring.

New Jersey passed the Toxic Catastrophe Prevention Act five years ago, which regulates facilities that contain an extraordinary hazardous substance. However, the report claims there are more than 90 locations in New Jersey that are not currently following these regulations.

At Blume Forte, our New Jersey chemical accident lawyers are dedicated to protecting the rights and wellbeing of clients. If you or a loved one has been injured during an on-the-job accident, call our legal team at (973) 635-5400 to receive a no-cost consultation that can help you better understand your rights and legal options.

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